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Datyfray Is The Fresh Sound We’ve All Been Waiting For – ADE Exclusive Interview

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Joining us for his first-ever ADE in the Audionamix popup studio Amsterdam, we sat down for a chat with Datyfray – an up-and-coming Italian artist who lives and breathes creativity.
Sound different, think different, be different, that’s Datyfray’s mantra, and you can see that reflected all too well in his music. Mixing classic techno sounds with a blend of futuristic and traditional melodies, his two singles, “Vassari” and “Surround Me,” are already pushing the boundaries of what we might expect from a modern artist. His sound combines that iconic late-night club energy with a feeling of intrigue and mystery, and here at radio, we couldn’t be more excited to find out what’s coming next.

“The project,” he says about his latest single, “was started as a more future rave, with a trancey melody and a catchy phrase with vocals, especially in the bridge. So, with Amyss at the end, [we] decided to modify the melody about the central drop to a very, very punchy kick to make very strong.”

As Datyfray is quick to clarify, Amyss is his “partner in crime”; the two have worked together on “Surround Me.” With 38’000 plays and rising on Spotify, the track is a definite success and a clear sign that collaboration is going well.
Datyfray
Of course, collaboration comes in many forms, and in our genre, sampling is one of the most common forms of collaboration. When asked about his favorite examples of the technique, Datyfray gave us two classic tracks.

“Black Box Right On Time - is a famous song from the ‘90s. It was actually an Italian project […] and a nice example of sampling to create new and groovy… And another type that I like is not a sample but a creative sample - I’m Blue (Da Ba Dee). If you listen, Maurizio Lobina and Jeffery Jay created the song and used a sample of Jeffery. So, it’s kind of sampling, and I fell in love with something like that.”

Suffice it to say, those are two excellent recommendations, and we’re bound to have them stuck in our heads for the longest time. As for his work, he says he doesn’t rely on sampling too much but that he used to experiment with it to create a new style and that he will probably use it more in the future.
To learn more about Datyfray, his experience at ADE, and his worst nightmare, then check out the full, exclusive below.

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